“Is this article consistent with the latest thinking and knowledge in science?”
“Would experts in this field endorse the main message of this article?”

These are the types of questions our “feedbacks” are designed to answer. If the feedback is positive, you can generally assume the information you’re reading is of high credibility. If it’s negative, however, you may want to read with extra care and attention — some of the information contained and conclusions reached are not consistent with science.[1]


Guardian explores sea level rise impact on cities, but fails to make timescale clear

in The Guardian, by Jonathan Watts, Dom Phillips, Helen Roxburgh, Josh Holder, Justin McCurry, Niko Kommenda, Richard Luscombe, & Ruth Michaelson

"This article provides an excellent visual of an unfortunately very likely general future for humanity, in which sea level rise slowly inundates many coastal cities ... However, one major drawback of this article is that the magnitude and timescale of the sea level rises described in this report are not well explained."

— 09 Nov 2017


The Independent makes a giant leap in stating that modern global warming could be “worse than thought” based on a single study

in The Independent, by Andrew Griffin

"The article reports on a paper which suggests there may be complications with ONE method we use to determine past ocean temperature. Notwithstanding possible flaws in the methods of the paper, the article ignores significant evidence from other measurements and observations and tells us nothing directly about the severity of future and present climate change."

— 01 Nov 2017


Commentary in The Australian ignores evidence and misrepresents research while falsely claiming humans are not responsible for climate change

in The Australian, by Ian Plimer

"Yet another in the exhausting heap of opinions choosing not to engage with evidence, while still expecting readers to believe inaccurate and baseless claims. It is baffling why publications such as The Australian wish to promote opinions that are both not well-argued and demonstrably not based on fact."

— 26 Oct 2017


BBC article on ocean acidification report accurate but brief

in BBC, by Roger Harrabin

"A good summary of BIOACID's key results. The information provided here is based on peer-reviewed scientific articles... I think these complex (and so far poorly understood) food web interactions deserve attention by both the public and the scientific community."

— 25 Oct 2017


New York Times’ “straightforward answers” to common climate questions are accurate, too

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

This article in The New York Times serves as a primer by briefly answering seventeen basic questions about the cause and consequences of—and possible solutions to—climate change. Ten scientists reviewed the article, and generally found the answers to be highly accurate distillations of the research on that topic.

— 28 Sep 2017


Daily Wire article misunderstands study on carbon budget (along with Fox News, The Telegraph, The Daily Mail, Breitbart…)

in The Daily Wire, by James Barrett

"The article selectively quotes from interviews and scientific papers to create the false perception that climate models significantly overestimate the rate of warming. The article also falsely implies that the cited paper is about the so called “hiatus” while the paper is actually about the carbon budget for the 1.5 ºC target."

— 21 Sep 2017


Global Warming and fire suppression practices boost wildfires in the US West, as correctly reported in The Atlantic

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

"The article provides an excellent summary of how rising air temperatures are leading to drier conditions and more fire activity among forests in parts of the western United States. The article is strengthened by including multiple interviews with scientists who have produced seminal studies of fire-climate interactions in this region."

— 11 Sep 2017


The Atlantic accurately explores climate context for Tropical Storm Harvey

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

"A well written article that captures the essence of our understanding that under climate change storms will likely bring more rainfall. In the case of Harvey, all we can say is that it is consistent with those ideas. But we cannot say that it is the direct consequence of climate change."

— 29 Aug 2017


New York Times accurately assesses the state of Alaskan permafrost

in The New York Times, by Henry Fountain

"The article is accurate in its descriptions of the physical and ecological processes that are behind permafrost changes. It also does a good job of getting across the nature of the work of actual scientists working in the field, what they are doing and why they are doing it."

— 24 Aug 2017


Forbes article accurately describes research on Atlantic ocean circulation weakening, but headline goes farther

in Forbes, by Trevor Nace

"This is an accurate, concise summary of the slowdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and its possible future states. There are a couple of minor issues: specifically, one of the links goes to an irrelevant article, and it would be useful to have a couple more citations to the scientific literature. The title is possibly a little overstated; I might instead say that the AMOC is at risk of collapsing in a warming world."

— 09 Aug 2017


[1] Note: These feedbacks do not constitute endorsements of the author’s political or economic ideology, rather they are assessments of the scientific foundations and reasoning of the argumentation contained within each article.