Tag: Sea level rise

IFLScience story on Florida sea level rise somewhat unclear but generally correct

2018-01-16

“While the information in this article is essentially correct, the links lead to loosely related articles published on the same website, rather than articles that directly support the statements made in the article. The explanation of the acceleration of sea level rise in Florida is oversimplified, probably because it is difficult to summarize concisely.”


Grist article on an “Ice Apocalypse” mostly accurate, but doesn’t make the likelihood of that apocalypse clear enough to readers

2017-11-28

“The article has a bias, emphasizing the high end scenarios of ice sheet behavior, avoiding scrutiny of model assumptions. The concept of marine ice cliff instability and how unusual it is as a mechanism today on the vast coastline of Antarctica or Greenland is ignored.”


Guardian explores sea level rise impact on cities, but fails to make timescale clear

2017-11-09

“This article provides an excellent visual of an unfortunately very likely general future for humanity, in which sea level rise slowly inundates many coastal cities … However, one major drawback of this article is that the magnitude and timescale of the sea level rises described in this report are not well explained.”


New York Times’ “straightforward answers” to common climate questions are accurate, too

2017-09-28

This article in The New York Times serves as a primer by briefly answering seventeen basic questions about the cause and consequences of—and possible solutions to—climate change. Ten scientists reviewed the article, and generally found the answers to be highly accurate distillations of the research on that topic.


Scientists explain what New York Magazine article on “The Uninhabitable Earth” gets wrong

2017-07-12

“While it is clear that ongoing warming of the global climate would eventually have very severe consequences, the concept of the Earth becoming uninhabitable within anywhere near the timescales suggested in the article is pure hyperbole. The author has clearly done very extensive research and addresses a number of climate threats that are indeed major issues, but generally the narrative ramps up the threat to go beyond the level that is supported by science.”


New York Times series accurately describes research on Antarctic ice sheets and sea level rise, but highlights uncertain studies

2017-05-23

“Generally scientifically sound, but caution should be displayed before basing discussion solely on a single modeling study, especially when it incorporates fundamentally different processes relative to other contemporary models.”


Analysis of “Miami’s fight against rising seas”

2017-04-07

“The information in this story is generally correct—the frequency and severity of flooding is accelerating due to sea level rise, and the quoted scientists from NOAA and FAU are credible experts in this field.”


Analysis of “Record-breaking climate change pushes world into ‘uncharted territory’”

2017-03-22

“The article clearly and concisely documents some of 2016’s climate extremes and puts them in the context of the warming trend.”


Analysis of “About Those Non-Disappearing Pacific Islands”

2016-10-17

“This article is very interesting because it exemplifies a highly-misleading rhetorical practice that is effective, frequently used, but not easily recognized by the public: “paltering”… A successful palterer will try to avoid being untruthful in each of his/her utterances, but will nonetheless put together a highly misleading picture based on selective reporting, half-truths, and errors of omission…”


Analysis of “Flooding of Coast, Caused by Global Warming, Has Already Begun”

2016-09-07

“The theory of sea-level rise and flood problems is pretty well understood — this makes the point that this theory is also happening now and can only be expected to get worse — sea levels have been rising on the US east coast for the last 150 years or more and even if current trends simply continue, impacts will continue to grow. As the article states, we actually expect a significant acceleration of sea-level rise in the coming decades meaning the impacts will grow more rapidly.”