Articles tagged as: Sound reasoning definition

Analysis of “From extreme drought to record rain: Why California’s drought-to-deluge cycle is getting worse”

in Los Angeles Times, by Paige St. John and Rong-Gong Lin II

“The article is accurate and highlights the challenges that California’s water resource managers are facing due to climate change. There are some issues with differentiating natural climate variability and forced climate change but the main points are correct.”

— 14 Apr 2017


Analysis of “U.S. scientists officially declare 2016 the hottest year on record. That makes three in a row.”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“The article accurately conveys the US agencies’ declaration of 2016 as the hottest year on record. It provides some good background material on why the agencies’ numbers differ slightly (treatment of the Arctic) and the contributing roles of El Niño and man-made global warming.”

— 19 Jan 2017


Analysis of “Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has worst coral die-off ever”

in USA Today, by Doyle Rice

“This article is mostly accurate … the frequency of massive bleaching events is increasing, will continue to increase in the near future, and these events do not need to occur annually to kill the reef. The variability of El Niño Southern Oscillation on top of the background warming trend of surface temperatures means that we will exceed the bleaching thresholds more frequently.”

— 30 Nov 2016


Analysis of “Greenland’s huge annual ice loss is even worse than thought”

in The Guardian, by Damian Carrington

“I find the headline accurate and supported by the article. The article explains the novelty and impact of the research accurately for the general readership and in particular the context provided from the scientists works really well in this regard.”

— 26 Sep 2016


Analysis of “Flooding of Coast, Caused by Global Warming, Has Already Begun”

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“The theory of sea-level rise and flood problems is pretty well understood — this makes the point that this theory is also happening now and can only be expected to get worse — sea levels have been rising on the US east coast for the last 150 years or more and even if current trends simply continue, impacts will continue to grow. As the article states, we actually expect a significant acceleration of sea-level rise in the coming decades meaning the impacts will grow more rapidly.”

— 07 Sep 2016


Analysis of “Disasters like Louisiana floods will worsen as planet warms, scientists warn”

in The Guardian, by Oliver Milman

“this article does a good job reporting on the recent floods in Lousiana and, more generally, the climate-change-induced changes in the water cycle that underlie scientists’ concerns about future increase in floods. However, “heavy rainfall” is not strictly synonymous to “flooding”…”

— 18 Aug 2016


Analysis of “Thanks to climate change, the Arctic is turning green”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“The article reports about recent evidence that terrestrial ecosystems are ‘greening’ in response to human activities, principally the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. The author presents this ‘greening’ as a new finding while annual global carbon budgets have reported that about 25% of the fossil-fuel emissions have been taken up by the biosphere since the 1960s. Nothing is fundamentally wrong in the article but it is organized in a somewhat misleading way”

— 04 Jul 2016


Analysis of “What we’re doing to the Earth has no parallel in 66 million years, scientists say”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“It sadly implies that even the PETM, a massive warm climatic excursion, might not be harsh enough to represent an analogue for future climate change, as the Washington Post rightfully points out.”

— 23 Mar 2016


Analysis of “Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries”

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

Justin Gillis reports on new results showing that the current rate of sea level rise is unprecedented in a record dating back 2,000 years. The article explains that this rise is attributable to human induced climate change and that higher sea levels are already impacting coastal communities. The seven scientists who reviewed the article confirmed that it is accurate and insightful.

— 25 Feb 2016


Analysis of “2015 Was Hottest Year in Historical Record, Scientists Say”

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

The article accurately covers the news that the global surface temperature of the planet in 2015 has set a new record, well above any previous measurement.

— 21 Jan 2016