Articles tagged as: Sound reasoning definition

Washington Post accurately describes ocean warming study with potential implications for future carbon budget

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney, Brady Dennis

“The Washington Post article accurately reports the results and links to other topics using reliable sources. Quotations from Pieter Tans and Paul Durack add important caveats showing that this is strong new evidence but not the final say. This caution is vital for readers to interpret the findings.”

— 03 Nov 2018


Guardian story accurately describes study on environmental impacts of our food system

in The Guardian, by Damian Carrington

“Although the presented facts are clear, the scientists give a personal interpretation of the priorities and needed policies, which are not covered in the source. The data give added value, but are in line with earlier studies.”

— 17 Oct 2018


National Geographic accurately covers research pointing to slower-moving hurricanes

in National Geographic, by Craig Welch

“This is an important topic and the article explains the new research findings clearly… Highlighting how this result about slowing storms is consistent across two studies that employ very different methodologies further helps convey to the public how we try to use multiple lines of evidence to understand how our world works and how it may chance in the future.”

— 08 Jun 2018


New York Times story accurately describes Rio Grande’s climate context

in The New York Times, by Henry Fountain

“The issue of water resource management in the western US and how it fits within a changing climate is extremely complex and spans many disciplines from climatology to hydrology to city planning to population dynamics, and so on. This article does a nice job presenting the very basics of the climate science involved and tying the greater changes to the personal stories of people in the region.”

— 31 May 2018


Washington Post accurately covers permafrost study, albeit under a somewhat sensational headline

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

The article accurately described a study indicating that more of the carbon released from thawing permafrost will be released as methane and provided context on its overall implications by quoting comments from two other researchers. The article’s headline, however, may mislead readers through the use of the sensational phrase “the Arctic’s carbon bomb”, which calls to mind a catastrophic, explosive release of greenhouse gas.

— 22 Mar 2018


New satellite measurements show sea level rise is accelerating, as CNN accurately reports

in CNN, by Brandon Miller

“Global geological sea-level data, data from tide gauge and now satellite data all show that the rate of sea level rise is accelerating. These accelerations in sea level is a cause for great concern.”

— 15 Feb 2018


New York Times accurately covers 2017 record low Arctic winter sea ice extent

in The New York Times, by Henry Fountain

“The article accurately reports on the state of Arctic sea ice at the annual maximum (in March) and its causes, and gives an insightful discussion as to the implications. There is one point which may be misleading…”

— 16 Jan 2018


New York Times’ news coverage of 2016 global temperature data was an accurate summary

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“A clear and accurate article on the temperature record in 2016, looking back at the records in 2015 and 2014. The article places them in the proper context of long-term warming, while mentioning the special effect that helped make the year a record.”

— 16 Jan 2018


Grist article on an “Ice Apocalypse” mostly accurate, but doesn’t make the likelihood of that apocalypse clear enough to readers

in Grist, by Eric Holthaus

“The article has a bias, emphasizing the high end scenarios of ice sheet behavior, avoiding scrutiny of model assumptions. The concept of marine ice cliff instability and how unusual it is as a mechanism today on the vast coastline of Antarctica or Greenland is ignored.”

— 28 Nov 2017


Global Warming and fire suppression practices boost wildfires in the US West, as correctly reported in The Atlantic

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

“The article provides an excellent summary of how rising air temperatures are leading to drier conditions and more fire activity among forests in parts of the western United States. The article is strengthened by including multiple interviews with scientists who have produced seminal studies of fire-climate interactions in this region.”

— 11 Sep 2017