Articles tagged as: Accurate definition

New York Times series accurately describes research on Antarctic ice sheets and sea level rise, but highlights uncertain studies

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“Generally scientifically sound, but caution should be displayed before basing discussion solely on a single modeling study, especially when it incorporates fundamentally different processes relative to other contemporary models.”

— 23 May 2017


ThinkProgress story on thawing Alaskan tundra generally accurate but somewhat misleading

in Think Progress, by Joe Romm

“The writing is a bit over the top, but factually correct in general. The main weakness is in linking the solidly evidence-based observed changes from the Commane et al paper with much more speculative links such as the Siberian methane bubbles.”

— 19 May 2017


Insightful Bloomberg coverage on the rapidly changing Arctic: sea ice melt and permafrost thawing

in Bloomberg, by Blacki Migliozzi & Eric Roston

Declining Arctic sea ice cover and thawing permafrost are both complex feedbacks that amplify global warming: The loss of reflective sea ice means more sunlight absorbed by the dark Arctic Ocean, while thawing permafrost can release greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

— 21 Apr 2017


Analysis of “From extreme drought to record rain: Why California’s drought-to-deluge cycle is getting worse”

in Los Angeles Times, by Paige St. John and Rong-Gong Lin II

“The article is accurate and highlights the challenges that California’s water resource managers are facing due to climate change. There are some issues with differentiating natural climate variability and forced climate change but the main points are correct.”

— 14 Apr 2017


Analysis of “One of the most troubling ideas about climate change just found new evidence in its favor”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“Overall, this piece accurately describes the findings of a new research paper by Mann et al on linkages between rapid Arctic warming and extreme weather at Earth’s more temperate latitudes. While there are a couple of statements that are overly confident given available evidence in the peer-reviewed literature, the author generally does an excellent job placing this new work into the broader context of related studies over the past decade.”

— 29 Mar 2017


Analysis of “Record-breaking climate change pushes world into ‘uncharted territory’”

in The Guardian, by Damian Carrington

“The article clearly and concisely documents some of 2016’s climate extremes and puts them in the context of the warming trend.”

— 22 Mar 2017


Analysis of “Large Sections of Australia’s Great Reef Are Now Dead, Scientists Find”

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis & Damien Cave

While natural temperature fluctuations (due to El Niño, for example) have always occurred, they are now superimposed on a warmer background due to human-induced global warming. That causes mass coral bleaching to happen more frequently.

— 18 Mar 2017


Analysis of “Here’s why it’s so frickin’ hot right now”

in Mashable, by Andrew Freedman

“a nice summary of the current warm events in the bigger context of climate change. I caution against using a single month of data to support claims about climate change impacts on extremes, but the discussion about record highs outpacing record lows is a good one and provides strong evidence for influence of global warming on regional weather.”

— 28 Feb 2017


Analysis of “Scientists have just detected a major change to the Earth’s oceans linked to a warming climate”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“Changes in ocean chemistry, temperature, and circulation have significant consequences for marine life and can initiate positive feedbacks to accelerate ocean and atmosphere warming. This article is refreshing in that the author presents the results and significance of global ocean oxygen loss accurately and very clearly for non-expert audiences.”

— 19 Feb 2017


Analysis of “What California’s Dam Crisis Says About the Changing Climate”

in The New York Times, by Noah Diffenbaugh

Warm dry years followed by extremely wet years have always been part of the climate of California, but warming can worsen both extremes by increasing evaporation, which makes droughts worse as well as put more moisture into the atmosphere allowing heavier downpours.

— 16 Feb 2017