Articles tagged as: Accurate definition

National Geographic video of starving polar bear should have clarified uncertain link to climate change

in National Geographic, by Sarah Gibbens

“The article contains valid information on the devastating consequences of climate change on polar bears. The only problem as I see it is that the article presents (implicitly) that the polar bear in the video is dying as a consequence of climate change and from not finding enough food due to lack of sea ice…”

— 17 Jan 2018


Atlantic story on the climate implications of reduced beef consumption could provide clearer context

in The Atlantic, by James Hamblin

“The article explains the issue (meat production diverts crops from humans to cattle) on a simple level. More explanation and more context could have been provided, I think, regarding individual-level and sectoral sources of greenhouse emissions.”

— 17 Jan 2018


New York Times effectively informs readers about large Larsen C iceberg calving event

in The New York Times, by Jugal K. Patel and Justin Gillis

“The article handles a complex topic well. It would be easy to be alarmist with this subject matter, and while its lede edges that way, the main content of the article is very balanced. It also presents a lot of interesting information in a compelling manner.”

— 17 Jan 2018


New York Times accurately covers 2017 record low Arctic winter sea ice extent

in The New York Times, by Henry Fountain

“The article accurately reports on the state of Arctic sea ice at the annual maximum (in March) and its causes, and gives an insightful discussion as to the implications. There is one point which may be misleading…”

— 16 Jan 2018


New York Times’ news coverage of 2016 global temperature data was an accurate summary

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“A clear and accurate article on the temperature record in 2016, looking back at the records in 2015 and 2014. The article places them in the proper context of long-term warming, while mentioning the special effect that helped make the year a record.”

— 16 Jan 2018


Grist article on an “Ice Apocalypse” mostly accurate, but doesn’t make the likelihood of that apocalypse clear enough to readers

in Grist, by Eric Holthaus

“The article has a bias, emphasizing the high end scenarios of ice sheet behavior, avoiding scrutiny of model assumptions. The concept of marine ice cliff instability and how unusual it is as a mechanism today on the vast coastline of Antarctica or Greenland is ignored.”

— 28 Nov 2017


BBC article on ocean acidification report accurate but brief

in BBC, by Roger Harrabin

“A good summary of BIOACID’s key results. The information provided here is based on peer-reviewed scientific articles… I think these complex (and so far poorly understood) food web interactions deserve attention by both the public and the scientific community.”

— 25 Oct 2017


New York Times’ “straightforward answers” to common climate questions are accurate, too

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

This article in The New York Times serves as a primer by briefly answering seventeen basic questions about the cause and consequences of—and possible solutions to—climate change. Ten scientists reviewed the article, and generally found the answers to be highly accurate distillations of the research on that topic.

— 28 Sep 2017


Global Warming and fire suppression practices boost wildfires in the US West, as correctly reported in The Atlantic

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

“The article provides an excellent summary of how rising air temperatures are leading to drier conditions and more fire activity among forests in parts of the western United States. The article is strengthened by including multiple interviews with scientists who have produced seminal studies of fire-climate interactions in this region.”

— 11 Sep 2017


New York Times accurately assesses the state of Alaskan permafrost

in The New York Times, by Henry Fountain

“The article is accurate in its descriptions of the physical and ecological processes that are behind permafrost changes. It also does a good job of getting across the nature of the work of actual scientists working in the field, what they are doing and why they are doing it.”

— 24 Aug 2017