Articles tagged as: Accurate definition

2017 is on track to be among the hottest year recorded, scientists are not as surprised as ThinkProgress article suggests

in Think Progress, by Joe Romm

The scientists who have reviewed the article confirm it accurately reports that 2017 is on track to being one of the warmest years on record. Reviewers note this wasn’t as unexpected as the article states, but the fact that 2017 global surface temperature are that high is a clear reminder that global warming has not stopped or slowed down.

— 21 Jul 2017


The Atlantic accurately reports on study of the economic impacts of continued climate change in the US

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

This story in The Atlantic by Robinson Meyer describes a new study on the distribution of economic impacts that result from continued climate change in the United States. The study finds that the impacts would not be uniform throughout the country, but would reduce GDP to a greater degree in southern states, for example, while the northernmost states could experience net economic benefits from warmer temperatures.

— 03 Jul 2017


New York Times story highlights the growing number of extremely hot days in a warming world

in The New York Times, by Brad Plumer & Nadja Popovich

“The study’s claims all appear to be based on sound, peer-reviewed research. The claims are in line with longstanding predictions and are not cherry-picked or unrepresentative, although there are uncertainties as always in any prediction.”

— 26 Jun 2017


New York Times series accurately describes research on Antarctic ice sheets and sea level rise, but highlights uncertain studies

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“Generally scientifically sound, but caution should be displayed before basing discussion solely on a single modeling study, especially when it incorporates fundamentally different processes relative to other contemporary models.”

— 23 May 2017


ThinkProgress story on thawing Alaskan tundra generally accurate but somewhat misleading

in Think Progress, by Joe Romm

“The writing is a bit over the top, but factually correct in general. The main weakness is in linking the solidly evidence-based observed changes from the Commane et al paper with much more speculative links such as the Siberian methane bubbles.”

— 19 May 2017


Insightful Bloomberg coverage on the rapidly changing Arctic: sea ice melt and permafrost thawing

in Bloomberg, by Blacki Migliozzi & Eric Roston

Declining Arctic sea ice cover and thawing permafrost are both complex feedbacks that amplify global warming: The loss of reflective sea ice means more sunlight absorbed by the dark Arctic Ocean, while thawing permafrost can release greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

— 21 Apr 2017


Analysis of “From extreme drought to record rain: Why California’s drought-to-deluge cycle is getting worse”

in Los Angeles Times, by Paige St. John and Rong-Gong Lin II

“The article is accurate and highlights the challenges that California’s water resource managers are facing due to climate change. There are some issues with differentiating natural climate variability and forced climate change but the main points are correct.”

— 14 Apr 2017


Analysis of “One of the most troubling ideas about climate change just found new evidence in its favor”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“Overall, this piece accurately describes the findings of a new research paper by Mann et al on linkages between rapid Arctic warming and extreme weather at Earth’s more temperate latitudes. While there are a couple of statements that are overly confident given available evidence in the peer-reviewed literature, the author generally does an excellent job placing this new work into the broader context of related studies over the past decade.”

— 29 Mar 2017


Analysis of “Record-breaking climate change pushes world into ‘uncharted territory’”

in The Guardian, by Damian Carrington

“The article clearly and concisely documents some of 2016’s climate extremes and puts them in the context of the warming trend.”

— 22 Mar 2017


Analysis of “Large Sections of Australia’s Great Reef Are Now Dead, Scientists Find”

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis & Damien Cave

While natural temperature fluctuations (due to El Niño, for example) have always occurred, they are now superimposed on a warmer background due to human-induced global warming. That causes mass coral bleaching to happen more frequently.

— 18 Mar 2017