“Is this article consistent with the latest thinking and knowledge in science?”
“Would experts in this field endorse the main message of this article?”

These are the types of questions our “feedbacks” are designed to answer. If the feedback is positive, you can generally assume the information you’re reading is of high credibility. If it’s negative, however, you may want to read with extra care and attention — some of the information contained and conclusions reached are not consistent with science.[1]


The Atlantic accurately reports on study of the economic impacts of continued climate change in the US

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

This story in The Atlantic by Robinson Meyer describes a new study on the distribution of economic impacts that result from continued climate change in the United States. The study finds that the impacts would not be uniform throughout the country, but would reduce GDP to a greater degree in southern states, for example, while the northernmost states could experience net economic benefits from warmer temperatures.

— 03 Jul 2017


New York Times story highlights the growing number of extremely hot days in a warming world

in The New York Times, by Brad Plumer & Nadja Popovich

"The study’s claims all appear to be based on sound, peer-reviewed research. The claims are in line with longstanding predictions and are not cherry-picked or unrepresentative, although there are uncertainties as always in any prediction."

— 26 Jun 2017


Breitbart misrepresents research from 58 scientific papers to falsely claim that they disprove human-caused global warming

in Breitbart, by James Delingpole

"This article grossly misinterprets open-access scientific papers by simply looking at graphs and entirely ignoring their meaning as explained by authors in the text."

— 08 Jun 2017


Playing semantics, misleading Breitbart article downplays US contribution to climate change

in Breitbart, by Thomas D. Williams

"This whole post is based on semantics and basically one big strawman fallacy. The author is deliberately confusing air pollution from suspended particulate matter (as discussed in the WHO report) with pollution from carbon dioxide emissions (as discussed in the Reuters link and the Paris Agreement). Even though CO2 does not impact our health through “disease-causing pollutants that get into people’s lungs”, it does change our environment and the Earth’s climate, and in that sense does classify as a pollutant."

— 06 Jun 2017


In Paris Agreement op-ed, US Senator Ted Cruz misrepresents the costs and benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions

in CNN, by Senator Ted Cruz

Sen. Cruz’s article cites a single report that assessed only the costs of climate actions, relying on a series of assumptions that maximized those estimated costs, and that excluded the benefits of avoided climate change and of renewable sources of energy.

— 31 May 2017


New York Times series accurately describes research on Antarctic ice sheets and sea level rise, but highlights uncertain studies

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

"Generally scientifically sound, but caution should be displayed before basing discussion solely on a single modeling study, especially when it incorporates fundamentally different processes relative to other contemporary models."

— 23 May 2017


ThinkProgress story on thawing Alaskan tundra generally accurate but somewhat misleading

in Think Progress, by Joe Romm

"The writing is a bit over the top, but factually correct in general. The main weakness is in linking the solidly evidence-based observed changes from the Commane et al paper with much more speculative links such as the Siberian methane bubbles."

— 19 May 2017


The Daily Wire makes wild claims about climate change based on no evidence

in The Daily Wire, by Joseph Curl

"The article contains little to no rational treatment of observational data, but relies on heavily biased secondhand interpretation... Even the title is based on a lie. There is no 'study' that finds static temperatures for 19-years. This article is based on a newspaper article that makes this false statement based in turn on a blog post..."

— 09 May 2017


The Telegraph publishes false information about Arctic climate

in The Telegraph, by Christopher Booker

"This article suffers from a common error in reasoning. The author focuses on individual “snapshots” of the state of the climate while ignoring the long-term trends. Those trends occur over many decades and must be observed/considered over those time scales."

— 09 May 2017


Insightful Bloomberg coverage on the rapidly changing Arctic: sea ice melt and permafrost thawing

in Bloomberg, by Blacki Migliozzi & Eric Roston

Declining Arctic sea ice cover and thawing permafrost are both complex feedbacks that amplify global warming: The loss of reflective sea ice means more sunlight absorbed by the dark Arctic Ocean, while thawing permafrost can release greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

— 21 Apr 2017


[1] Note: These feedbacks do not constitute endorsements of the author’s political or economic ideology, rather they are assessments of the scientific foundations and reasoning of the argumentation contained within each article.