Articles tagged as: Insightful definition

New York Times series accurately describes research on Antarctic ice sheets and sea level rise, but highlights uncertain studies

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“Generally scientifically sound, but caution should be displayed before basing discussion solely on a single modeling study, especially when it incorporates fundamentally different processes relative to other contemporary models.”

— 23 May 2017


Insightful Bloomberg coverage on the rapidly changing Arctic: sea ice melt and permafrost thawing

in Bloomberg, by Blacki Migliozzi & Eric Roston

Declining Arctic sea ice cover and thawing permafrost are both complex feedbacks that amplify global warming: The loss of reflective sea ice means more sunlight absorbed by the dark Arctic Ocean, while thawing permafrost can release greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

— 21 Apr 2017


Analysis of “One of the most troubling ideas about climate change just found new evidence in its favor”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“Overall, this piece accurately describes the findings of a new research paper by Mann et al on linkages between rapid Arctic warming and extreme weather at Earth’s more temperate latitudes. While there are a couple of statements that are overly confident given available evidence in the peer-reviewed literature, the author generally does an excellent job placing this new work into the broader context of related studies over the past decade.”

— 29 Mar 2017


Analysis of “Here’s why it’s so frickin’ hot right now”

in Mashable, by Andrew Freedman

“a nice summary of the current warm events in the bigger context of climate change. I caution against using a single month of data to support claims about climate change impacts on extremes, but the discussion about record highs outpacing record lows is a good one and provides strong evidence for influence of global warming on regional weather.”

— 28 Feb 2017


Analysis of “Scientists have just detected a major change to the Earth’s oceans linked to a warming climate”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“Changes in ocean chemistry, temperature, and circulation have significant consequences for marine life and can initiate positive feedbacks to accelerate ocean and atmosphere warming. This article is refreshing in that the author presents the results and significance of global ocean oxygen loss accurately and very clearly for non-expert audiences.”

— 19 Feb 2017


Analysis of “U.S. scientists officially declare 2016 the hottest year on record. That makes three in a row.”

in The Washington Post, by Chris Mooney

“The article accurately conveys the US agencies’ declaration of 2016 as the hottest year on record. It provides some good background material on why the agencies’ numbers differ slightly (treatment of the Arctic) and the contributing roles of El Niño and man-made global warming.”

— 19 Jan 2017


Analysis of “Arctic ice melt ‘already affecting weather patterns where you live right now'”

in The Guardian, by Damian Carrington

“The article nicely introduces some of the emerging science linking Arctic climate change to extreme weather at lower latitudes. There are no major inaccuracies and the author has sought expert comment form several prominent scientists. However, the article fails to fully capture the large uncertainty about how Arctic warming may influence weather in places further south and how big this effect might be.”

— 21 Dec 2016


Analysis of “Amid higher global temperatures, sea ice at record lows at poles”

in CNN, by Brandon Miller

“Well outlined and balanced article, describing the evident link between low sea ice and climate warming and the melt-albedo feedback, but also mentioning the role of weather and short-time variability.”

— 24 Nov 2016


Analysis of “Greenland’s huge annual ice loss is even worse than thought”

in The Guardian, by Damian Carrington

“I find the headline accurate and supported by the article. The article explains the novelty and impact of the research accurately for the general readership and in particular the context provided from the scientists works really well in this regard.”

— 26 Sep 2016


Analysis of “Flooding of Coast, Caused by Global Warming, Has Already Begun”

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“The theory of sea-level rise and flood problems is pretty well understood — this makes the point that this theory is also happening now and can only be expected to get worse — sea levels have been rising on the US east coast for the last 150 years or more and even if current trends simply continue, impacts will continue to grow. As the article states, we actually expect a significant acceleration of sea-level rise in the coming decades meaning the impacts will grow more rapidly.”

— 07 Sep 2016