Articles tagged as: Insightful definition

New York Times effectively informs readers about large Larsen C iceberg calving event

in The New York Times, by Jugal K. Patel and Justin Gillis

“The article handles a complex topic well. It would be easy to be alarmist with this subject matter, and while its lede edges that way, the main content of the article is very balanced. It also presents a lot of interesting information in a compelling manner.”

— 17 Jan 2018


New York Times accurately covers 2017 record low Arctic winter sea ice extent

in The New York Times, by Henry Fountain

“The article accurately reports on the state of Arctic sea ice at the annual maximum (in March) and its causes, and gives an insightful discussion as to the implications. There is one point which may be misleading…”

— 16 Jan 2018


New York Times’ news coverage of 2016 global temperature data was an accurate summary

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“A clear and accurate article on the temperature record in 2016, looking back at the records in 2015 and 2014. The article places them in the proper context of long-term warming, while mentioning the special effect that helped make the year a record.”

— 16 Jan 2018


Grist article on an “Ice Apocalypse” mostly accurate, but doesn’t make the likelihood of that apocalypse clear enough to readers

in Grist, by Eric Holthaus

“The article has a bias, emphasizing the high end scenarios of ice sheet behavior, avoiding scrutiny of model assumptions. The concept of marine ice cliff instability and how unusual it is as a mechanism today on the vast coastline of Antarctica or Greenland is ignored.”

— 28 Nov 2017


Guardian explores sea level rise impact on cities, but fails to make timescale clear

in The Guardian, by Jonathan Watts, Dom Phillips, Helen Roxburgh, Josh Holder, Justin McCurry, Niko Kommenda, Richard Luscombe, & Ruth Michaelson

“This article provides an excellent visual of an unfortunately very likely general future for humanity, in which sea level rise slowly inundates many coastal cities … However, one major drawback of this article is that the magnitude and timescale of the sea level rises described in this report are not well explained.”

— 09 Nov 2017


Global Warming and fire suppression practices boost wildfires in the US West, as correctly reported in The Atlantic

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

“The article provides an excellent summary of how rising air temperatures are leading to drier conditions and more fire activity among forests in parts of the western United States. The article is strengthened by including multiple interviews with scientists who have produced seminal studies of fire-climate interactions in this region.”

— 11 Sep 2017


The Atlantic accurately explores climate context for Tropical Storm Harvey

in The Atlantic, by Robinson Meyer

“A well written article that captures the essence of our understanding that under climate change storms will likely bring more rainfall. In the case of Harvey, all we can say is that it is consistent with those ideas. But we cannot say that it is the direct consequence of climate change.”

— 29 Aug 2017


New York Times accurately assesses the state of Alaskan permafrost

in The New York Times, by Henry Fountain

“The article is accurate in its descriptions of the physical and ecological processes that are behind permafrost changes. It also does a good job of getting across the nature of the work of actual scientists working in the field, what they are doing and why they are doing it.”

— 24 Aug 2017


New York Times series accurately describes research on Antarctic ice sheets and sea level rise, but highlights uncertain studies

in The New York Times, by Justin Gillis

“Generally scientifically sound, but caution should be displayed before basing discussion solely on a single modeling study, especially when it incorporates fundamentally different processes relative to other contemporary models.”

— 23 May 2017


Insightful Bloomberg coverage on the rapidly changing Arctic: sea ice melt and permafrost thawing

in Bloomberg, by Blacki Migliozzi & Eric Roston

Declining Arctic sea ice cover and thawing permafrost are both complex feedbacks that amplify global warming: The loss of reflective sea ice means more sunlight absorbed by the dark Arctic Ocean, while thawing permafrost can release greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

— 21 Apr 2017